Episode Five: Life Science AdWords Secrets feat. Eric Southwell, AdWords Specialist

Google AdWords remains one of the most powerful ad networks available to target both B2B and B2C audiences. In this episode, we bring on our Google AdWords Advanced Certified Specialist, Eric Southwell, to give a deep dive into how you should be setting up your life science AdWords campaigns.

This episode includes:

  • How to scale up an AdWords campaign and what to look for
  • How to know what your competitors are doing on AdWords
  • How to create ads that get people to click
  • How to create a landing page that gets leads

Transcription:

Sheldon:

Hi, everyone. Welcome back to the Live Science Marketing Lab. This is Episode 5. I’m your host, Sheldon Zhai. I’m the founder and CEO of Supreme Optimization, the first digital marketing agency exclusively for life science companies. Today we’re going to be talking a little bit about AdWords, a little bit more in depth and trying to answer some of the four questions that come up commonly that are always asked by us, by our Life Science Marketing execs. Number one, how to scale up an AdWords campaign and what to look for. How do you know what your competitors are doing on AdWords. How to create ads to get people to click, and how to create landing pages that get leads.

On the call also we have Leigh.

Leigh:

Hi, guys. Leigh Wasson here. I run strategy for our projects, and my main focus is conversion optimization and the getting of leads and sales.

Sheldon:

And then we have Eric Southwell, who is our special guest today. He has his Google AdWords advanced certification. He’s our AdWords specialist.

Eric:

Yeah, thanks. Everybody, Eric here. I run and manage all of our around 30 accounts for Supreme across AdWords, LinkedIn and Facebook. I also run all of the marketing campaigns for Supreme, which we pretty much run exclusively on AdWords, LinkedIn, a little bit of Facebook and I also design and run all the landing pages and create all the marketing materials. So yeah, thanks for having me, Sheldon.

Sheldon:

Cool. Yeah, no problem. So just as a quick overview, on some of the earlier podcasts we had talked a little bit about traffic. So there’s four elements of a strong visual marketing campaign like we said; number one traffic, number two conversion, number three list building, and number four the funnel sale, so we’re back on track again and this is going to be about paid traffic and specifically AdWords. So, without further ado, let’s just dive into it.

So the first question is, how to scale up an AdWords campaign and what do you normally look for, Eric, when you are trying to figure out if you can scale up a campaign.

Eric:

Yeah, that’s a good question. So usually when I start an AdWords campaign, I try to keep the budget a little bit more conservative and low, and I will start the campaign with whatever product or service that has the highest chance of success, and then I will show it to the audience that has the highest chance of success. So, for example, let’s say that your life science company sells cell counters and there’s one particular cell counter that’s used by the Mayo Clinic, the National Institute of Health and a few other big research universities. So what I would do is I would start by just marketing to the United States because that’s probably your biggest market and where most of your traffic is going to be coming from anyway and also the most likely buyers and since that product is really well known and it has some really big names behind it, I would start with that one.

So what I would do is I would set up the ad copy, kind of catering to that really good product that you have. I might throw in some social proof and say, see the original style counter trusted by the Mayo Clinic and NIH to get people to click, and then I would just run that to people within the United States and probably at a relatively low cost per click. You know, that’s going to bring in less volume because people are probably going to be bidding higher than you, but we’re just trying to test it out and see if it’s profitable.

And so if we’re getting leads from that campaign, if people are coming to the website and saying hey, I’m really interested in this for my lab or for my research institution, what we’ll do from there is just make sure that it’s backing out, make sure that we’re getting good leads and sales, and so that kind of answers the question of like how I set up a campaign to start and then how do I scale it, which was your original question, Sheldon, is what I do is I would add another countries.

So the most typical countries that you want to scale to or that we find the most success in are Canada, most of Europe, depending on … It depends on the campaign and where your customers are and where you can send the product to, but for the most part most of Europe is good and a lot of people are like oh, but what if our ads aren’t in German, for example. Well, within AdWords you just select if people are searching for English or are searching in English. So most of Europe is good and then actually Australia and New Zealand we found kind of to be very good ones as well, low competition, so that’s good and also cheap clicks.

So those are the countries to go to first, so that’s one way we scale is just kind of broadening the audience. Another way you can scale is through increasing your bids. So what increasing your bids will do is generally it will make you appear higher within the search results. And so actually, I’m going to pause right there. Sheldon, did that that make sense? Do you guys have any questions before I keep going?

Sheldon:

Yeah, yeah, for sure. Actually I wanted to ask also when you’re setting up the campaigns initially, how many copy variations are you doing typically? Do you have a baseline that you usually start with?

Eric:

Yeah, we usually do two per keyword. So, for example, let’s just use the cell counter one. If anybody uses the word cell counter in their search, we’ll have two different ads that show up, and the general rule of thumb is after you get around 100 clicks or so, that’s enough to know which ad is performing better. If they’re close, I’ll keep it running a little bit longer, but generally, you can get an idea of what’s working from that. So I usually just do two.

Sheldon:

Gotcha, and when you say performing better, what metrics are you looking at to determine that?

Sheldon:

Gotcha. Along those lines so you had mentioned the baseline minimum data that you need is 100 clicks. Then you also mentioned three weeks. What do you usually go off of? Is it like time frame or as soon as you have the 100 clicks you’re making the distinction?

Eric:

It’s always the 100 clicks and the reason why is because some companies will get 100 clicks in a day. You know, if companies are spending five figures a month, the 10, 20, 30,000 thousand a month, it’s much faster to get to 100 clicks. However if you spend $1,000 a month and it’s going to take two weeks to get 100 clicks. So the 100 clicks is kind of the stable, one size fits all for no matter how much you’re spending.

Sheldon:

Awesome. Good question. Also I mean so I guess you’re talking about service based companies or just like with single products. What about tracking conversions? I mean, at what point … You know, obviously conversion tracking is a valuable part whenever you can measure it, it’s important because then you get more data on people that are actually contacting you or giving you a call or actually making a purchase. At what point does that become a really important measure of performance for ads?

Eric:

So on the ad itself, you’re really just looking for clicks through, right, because you’re trying to … It’s really hard to measure at a conversion level, especially because a lot of people in the life science industry that we work with are B2B, and so what that means is it’s low volume, but high quality. So I mean, we’ve worked with companies where we get them one lead a month, but that lead is the Mayo Clinic or that lead is Emory University, and if they get that lead, it’s really monumental to their growth. And so to say oh, that lead came from this ad or that ad performance, that’s too hard, so you can’t do it at conversion rates level. The goal of the ad is to get people to your landing page. So I just measure it based on if the person clicked on my ad.

So what I do is I measure the click through rate. So if one of my ads, let’s say I’m testing when one of my ads I’m testing a social proof angle, like so I go trusted by over 50 universities, including University of Wisconsin, University of Illinois, see our full ad of cell counters here. That’s one angle I’m going for. And then maybe the other angle I’m going for is a money back guarantee. So I’ll say check out our original cell counters since 1999. Money back guarantee if you’re not 100% satisfied.

So those are two different marking angles I’m testing, and so let’s say after running it for three weeks, I have 7% of everyone who sees the ad click on the social proof and only 3% click on the money back guarantee. Well, I know the social proof is a better way to get people to the click and get to the landing page. Regardless of where the sale or the lead comes through, the main goal of your ad is just to get people to click through, not necessarily to buy. I mean obviously that’s the end goal, but it’s just too hard to measure.

Eric:

Well, conversion tracking is the most important metric. So if anybody is listening to this right now and you’re running a campaign that is for profit … Some of the companies we work with they’re not running campaigns for profit, that’s the reason I say that. I know that sounds weird, but we work with a couple of, you know, bigger biotech pharma companies that say, I just want to be the number one search result anytime someone searches this. They just want to … It’s a branding play, and so they don’t need the conversion tracking, they’re literally just trying to be number one.

But if you’re running campaigns for profit, which 95% percent of our companies do and you’re not doing conversion tracking, you should stop spending money because you have no idea to know if you’re getting a return on your ad spend. So Sheldon, in terms of your question of like how … Or Sheldon, just to repeat your question was like how do you make sure that the copywriting leads to a conversion? Was that it?

Sheldon:

Yeah, because earlier you were mentioning with some of the one-page products that it’s really hard to measure a conversion and sometimes you’re just looking at click through rate performance, so at what point does it become actually looking at the cost per conversion as the most important measure of success.

Eric:

Yes, so you look at the cost for conversion at the ad group level. So basically that’s also at the keyword level, assuming that you have someone who knows what they’re doing. So what you do is you look and you’d say like okay, for example, our cost per conversion is $1,000 a conversion on the keyword cell counter, but it’s only $200 per conversion on automated cell counter. So obviously you probably at least for now want to turn off the cell counter and turn on the automated cell counter.

As far as the clicks go, that has to do with the ad copy itself. So I look at it as it’s the job of the website or the landing page to convert that person from a prospect to a potential … You know, to give you their e-mail or their phone number, to a lead or a sale, but it’s the job of the ad to get them to the landing page or get them to the next step. So that’s why click through rate is really important because the truth of the matter is, you’re not going to get enough conversions even in a year to know which ad is doing best, because some of the clients we work with, if we send them 10 to 20 good leads in a year, that’s a potential seven or eight figures worth of revenue for them.

So being able to attribute that back to an ad, so the job of the ad, in order to be able to have any type of split testing at all, you need to be able to just measure click through rate, and it also makes sense I think intuitively because the job of the ad is to get them to the next step. So if you can get them on your landing page then … You know, because the ad there’s only 80 characters or 140 if you include headlines and all that, it’s a really small amount. You just try to get them to click and then once they click, you have your landing page where you can put images and videos and testimonials and carousels of images they can look through and see how it’s done and download. So the job of the landing page is to convert, but the job of the ad is to get them to the landing page. Does that makes sense?

Sheldon:

Yeah, that’s a really, really good point. I just wanted to mention that’s a big mistake that we see people make often is that they try to sell the product in the ad, which you know, if you’re not into this whole world that seems like that’s what you want to do, right? You have an ad so you’re trying to sell your product, but as you mentioned that’s not the job of the ad. The ad is to get the click. So it’s very different, right? And it affects how you actually write that copy because you want to have kind of a reveal, like what’s on the other side of this. You’re not actually trying to convert anybody yet.

Eric:

Yeah, I think at the highest level, like if I was showing a client … You know, we provide clients KPI reports every single month, and the most important KPI is cost per conversion. The client just wants to know, okay, how many leads do we get, how much does it cost us in total to get those leads, and how much is it costing us per lead. So maybe we sent them 10 leads and it cost us $5,000 for those 10 leads at an average cost per lead of $500 per lead. That is the strongest indicator if you’re being successful on AdWords.

At the individual ad account, which you might have depending on the size of your account anywhere from two ads to 10,000 ads running, you’re measuring click through rate, but I would never show a client like hey, check it out, we got a 7% click through rate on this ad, because it doesn’t mean anything. You know, it doesn’t mean anything towards the success of the campaign, but it means something to me at the micro level when I’m trying to determine what is it getting potential buyers interested in what we’re selling.

Sheldon:

That’s super interesting. I think the clear distinction here is, so click through rate is the most important indicator of success when you’re looking at the individual ad itself, right, and the performance, because the goal of that ad is just to get people to click through, but if you look at the ad group based off the keywords that are all associated with that ad group, then are you saying that the most important indicator of success then is the cost per conversion for that group of keywords and all those ads, you know, and the conversion being like someone submitting a form on the actual landing page or something? Is that what you’re saying?

Eric:

Yeah, exactly. And this is especially true for Google AdWords, because with Google AdWords you get 140 characters. If you’re doing Facebook, you can have an image, you can have a video, you can write an entire novel on the ad and people can click “See more” and read the whole thing. So you can sell better on different networks and same with LinkedIn, you can do a little bit more selling with an image, but with Google you have 140 characters total between both headlines and the description. I’m not sure of that exact character count, but it’s something along those lines. So with that it’s like just get the person on your website and then you can start selling them.

Leigh:

Right on. Yeah, that’s really interesting. Okay, let’s see. So …

Sheldon:

Actually, why don’t we just jump into let’s skip to question three here, as to how do you create ads that get people to click, it seems to tie in nicely here. So what are some tips that you found of how to get that click initially?

Eric:

Yeah, I always think of this Albert Einstein quote, which is, “Make everything as simple as possible and no simpler.”

Sheldon:

That’s great.

Eric:

But yeah, it’s really, really surprising, but it is and it isn’t, but the best ads I found are simple, truthful and accurate. Just like if you look at a website and you can’t tell what they do in three seconds, it’s the same with like an ad. If someone searches for an ad it has to just say exactly what it is in 140 characters, it has to be accurate, and it has to be honest. And if you can do those three things, then you’re going to be doing better than probably 80% of your competitors, because most people aren’t doing that, they’re making it really complicated. So that’s first and foremost is just that when I’m running the ad copy.

The next one and anyone who’s at least average at running AdWords, is you have to use the keyword in the ad, and this is why when we set up campaigns for our clients we do the single keyword ad groups, because ads are at the keyword level. So going back to the cell counters example, if somebody searched what is the best automated cell counter, you know, if my ad came up first, it would say the original automated cell counter. It would use the keyword in the ads, so what the person searched is appearing in the ad itself. And that’s twofold. So one, the searcher is going to say, oh this is relevant to what I’m searching, and Google … I don’t know, did you guys talk about quality score at all in the last call?

Leigh:

Yeah, we talked about it-

Sheldon:

I think we touched on it a little bit, yeah.

Leigh:

We touched on about what impacts the cost per click. You know, quality score of one to 10, the higher your quality score it’s inversely correlated to how much you pay. So you pay less with a higher score compared to-

Eric:

Exactly. Yeah, there’s only three components of a quality score actually, so it’s pretty simple and one of them is ad relevance. So if the ad itself has the keyword in it, then the quality score is going to be higher. So if someone searches automated cell counters and the ad says automated cell counters, Google is going to give you a high quality score because Google is saying hey, like this is relevant to our users and we want the best user experience for our users, so we’re going to give you a higher placement, you’re going to pay less for clicks.

So the alternative is, let’s say I write an ad that says automated cell counters, that’s the search and my ad says, you know, the best cell counters, it doesn’t have the word automated in it, Google’s going to kind of give that a point down because it’s not matching what they’re searching for exactly. So in terms of ad copy, simple, accurate and truthful. You have to make sure that you’re using the keyword at least once, but we recommend and Google recommends twice; once in the head and once the description, so those two things.

And then usually I try to tie in one marketing kind of tactic in there. So I’ll usually just pull … Or I’ll ask the client what makes you different, and if it’s price, I’ll list the price on that ad because if it’s something really, really specific like let’s say next generation sequencing and you can offer services provided to NGS for cheaper than any other competitors and that’s why you always win, I’ll list the price in there right away, because people who are searching for it knows this particular service related to it costs $1,000 and if this one is going for $800, that jumps out at me, so I’ll do it.

If it’s price, I’ll do that. If you guys offer a money back guarantee and nobody else does it, I’ll list that. If you’re the best, meaning every university uses it, you guys are the most reliable, you’re the most accurate, I’ll list that. So I just try to find what the best thing about is it that’s unique and then I highlight that. So just to recap the three things; use a keyword in the ad, make sure it’s really simple to understand and it’s truthful and it’s accurate, and then highlight your biggest selling point, and that’s about all you can do in 140 characters.

Sheldon:

That’s great. One thing I just thought of is sometimes it’s difficult to get with … You just ask yourself what makes me unique. Sometimes you get generic responses back or things like quality, service, et cetera. It’s like well, that’s not really that helpful. So one barometer that you can kind of gauge if the fact is unique, is if you were to put any of your competitor’s logo over that fact, could they say the same thing? If so, that’s not a unique differentiator right?

Eric:

Mm-hmm.

Sheldon:

And another I think I’ve noticed is like when interviewing clients and trying to kind of get that information out, that like real differentiator, sometimes I’ll use a question like what … Especially if I’m talking to a person that does in-sales presentations. I’ll ask them what gets people’s eyes to light up in the room when you say it. Because it’s kind of putting a story in their head and they’re like oh yeah, it’s this, right, and then it’s always good information if they have like a memory they can trigger with that and usually that’s kind of the meat of the differentiator that you can pull out.

Eric:

Nice. Yeah, I think the story is big and the story is really important on the landing page, too. So whenever I’m building a landing page I frequently have a face of somebody at the company who’s been there for a while and being like hey, I’m Dr. Smith and I invented blank 20 years ago because I was frustrated with the solutions out there and now it’s trusted by over blank universities including blah, blah, blah, blah. So it’s just like that story element’s involved and people love stories.

Sheldon:

Yeah. That’s great, and they also love that one to one … That’s really the point of the landing page, is you want to create that one to one experience like you said, right? So using images of real people and often times it actually works against you to use stock photos because you can smell a stock image a mile away, right? So anytime you can use a real photo and tell a real story like you just said, that works really, really well.

Eric:

Yeah, I agree. And maybe is this a good segue into the landing page stuff, because I know you guys said some people asked us about landing pages.

Sheldon:

Yeah, yeah. So how would you say … You know, that’s another question here is how to create landing pages that get leads, that get the conversion.

Eric:

Okay, so specifically on the AdWords side, if you just Google AdWords landing page requirements. So we were talking about quality score earlier, there’s three elements of a good quality score. So one of them is the ad relevance, which we just talked about and that’s having the keyword in the ad. The other one is having a high click through rate. So that’s having good copy that makes people click, and then the last one is your landing page experience.

And so there’s two aspects of doing landing pages for paid advertising on the AdWord side. One is making sure that your landing page is compliant with how Google wants landing pages to be, and the other is just making sure that your landing page is high quality and gets people to want to give you their most personal information, which is either their phone number or their e-mail and sometimes both and a lot more than that.

So in terms of the landing page quality score, I think it’s better for anybody listening just to search that, because it’s going to be kind of a checklist of things you need to make sure you have to have the privacy policy, it has to be mobile responsive. There’s a bunch of things Google looks for and we won’t get too in-depth into that on this call. But in terms of a landing page that converts, I think the most important thing for the life science industry is social proof. The main reason being there’s a lot of options out there and there’s also a lot of kind of big top customers.

You know, research universities, like for example the University of Wisconsin, they’re of the top public research universities in the country and they have huge spending power and they have some of the top researchers as well, and so they need high quality products, really reliable products. And so I found if you’re selling something and you’re not one of the big guys, if you’re not Thermo,if you’re not Ilumina, and you’re selling something on AdWords, and someone comes to your landing page, you need to convince them right away like hey, other big companies or big universities are using our service and right away someone goes, oh, if this is good enough for the University of Wisconsin, this is good enough for me.

So on the landing page I always, always have people dig deep in order to find some element of social proof, and I would say that that’s probably one of the most important pieces of it. Even if your landing page is bad, just having those logos at the top saying trusted by, that’s going to be huge. And there’s a couple other things-

Leigh:

What are some other-

Eric:

Yeah, go ahead, Leigh.

Leigh:

I was just going to ask, so let’s say if you’re newer to the market and you don’t have the big guys using your product yet, what are some other types of social proof that you can use?

Eric:

Yeah, if there’s not, you need to try and gain their trust in another way, because that’s the main thing. The main point of the social proof is you’re saying like hey, they trust us, you can too. So in order to win that trust, I think you need to have if you don’t have those big universities, and that’s a really good question Leigh, and Leigh, I don’t know if you remember, but this is actually something that you taught me a while back. It’s having somebody who works for your company kind of be the face of the landing page to an extent.

So for example, like let’s go back to the automatic cell counter example. So let’s say you sell automated cell counters and you have somebody at your company who has been using cell counters for 30 plus years or designing them, manufacturing them, whatever it is, for 20 years. Have a quote, have a nice, professional picture looking out into the views on the landing page and just saying I love working with blank because we make the best cell counters in my experience of over 30 plus years and we’re really focused on blank, blank, blank, something like that.

Something that really has that personal touch, so now I can say oh, and if you have any questions you can pick up and call right now, and it would say, call Dr. Kim or whatever it is, and so you can pick up and talk to that person. So I think it’s just having another way to have that element of trust, and if you can’t do it through … You know, if you’re kind of a newer player, if you can just do it by saying like hey, I’m a real person, I’m selling this and I really believe in it and I’ve been working in this industry for over 20 years, and if you want you can give me a call and we can talk about how it could be used for your lab, that’s another way that you get social proof without having some of the big guys kind of adopt.

Leigh:

Eric, I actually wanted to add something to that. So even earlier you’re talking about like the key to a great landing page is about telling stories, right, and that’s really at the core of it all marketing is. I just remember last year I read probably one of my favorite books of the year is by Seth Godin. He’s a really great entrepreneur and writer, so he has a good book called, All Marketers Are Liars, but actually if you look at the cover he strikes out liars and it says, tells stories. And he said that essentially every marketer, there’s three important questions; what’s your story, will the people who need to hear this story believe it, and is it true.

So pretty much like all marketers tell stories, and some examples are like we believe that wine tastes better in that $20 glass than a $1 glass. We believe that an $80,000 Porsche is vastly superior to a $36,000 Volkswagen, and it’s actually virtually the same car. We believe that $225 sneakers make our feet feel better and look cooler than a $25 brand, and believing it makes it true and I think that’s the main thing is that what you’re saying, you can add that social proof and in that social proof it can be like also a story from someone that actually has been working in that industry for a really long time, you know, kind of some of the problems that they had before and why this solution just works so much better, because that’s something that we can really believe in.

One more specific example, when you said that, you made me think about Kiehl’s. Kiehl’s is a cosmetic brand, and their story you see them in really nice malls all the time. They take so much care with the packaging of their cosmetic products. It all looks hand-crafted, and if you walk into a store sometimes you’ll see like just in the design and the feel, it’s a story and you’re feeling that and that’s what you’re buying into, even though honestly, the cosmetics, the lotions are probably not that different from your like $2 generic brand, but it’s a story about some guy who has been working in this industry for a long time that hand crafted these things, each thing with love and care and you want to believe that and that at the core of it, that story is something that you want to, I think … You know, some of those elements you want to bring out into a landing page or even not just a landing page, but for your marketing, and for your business in general.

Eric:

Yeah, I agree. And piggybacking on to that point, I think the millennial generation, particularly love stories and we’re all millennials on this call, so I feel okay saying that millennials are a little spoiled and they love a story. They love supporting like some great cause, but we also have pretty good B.S. detectors. You know, any ad I ever see for anything, a book or especially a guru of some sort, I’ll go online and be like blank reviews, you know, like millionairereviews.com, whatever the book is, and we’re able to sift through things like pretty quickly.

And so a really, really compelling story too, and the reason I talk about millennials is because over the next five or 10 years, these are going to be the people making all the decisions for the life science and biotech and pharma industries and a lot of them already are right now, and so we’re trying to market to ourselves basically, and the best way to do that is through a really, really good story that’s really transparent and it’s really honest, and I think that that’s the most effective kind of type of marketing now, because millennials are really smart with that and if we see an ad for something, we do our research and make sure that it makes sense.

Leigh:

Yep, 100%.

Sheldon:

That’s a great point.

Leigh:

We’re just towards the end of the 30 minute mark here, so I just wanted to ask Eric if you had any other final thoughts and maybe just a couple action items that someone can do if they’re just running their own AdWords campaign today. Maybe some quick things that might just help a little bit, if anything comes to mind.

Eric:

Yeah, definitely. Yeah, I think, you know, we just scratched the surface of AdWords and paid advertising. I listen to an AdWords podcast every single week and I think they’re on episode over 100, like 120 or something and it’s just on AdWords and they’re each an hour long. So if you’re in-house running your own AdWords campaign, I would say listen to a podcast like that because it’s hard to just kind of short cut it. There’s not a lot of like super quick tricks I can give you to make your AdWords campaigns like amazing. So I would just keep learning, listen to the AdWords podcast, stuff like that.

Another thing is, I don’t know we’re allowed to add this in here Sheldon, but occasionally we do like free audits for people. It’s just like a seven-point checklist. We go through your quality score, we review your bid modifications, we just check to see if you’re doing the basic stuff, and then if you’re doing some advance strategies as well. So reach out to us and see if we’re offering it at the time. Sometimes when we’re really busy, we don’t do it, but we do that quite a bit.

And then if your conversion tracking isn’t set up, I think that’s also step one, you know, get that set up, and then the last thing I would say is if you’re not doing AdWords at all, just go on Google right now, open up a window, search like two to five products. Like let’s say you were a researcher and just picture your ideal customer and then picture what your ideal customer would search to find you, so let’s say you’re selling … Let’s just use automated cell counters again. Let’s say a researcher is sick of doing the manual in any way shape or form, and what would they search for, and then look at the top three results.

Those are all going to be ads, and just say like, you know, are my competitors making money on here, and if they are, then you should look into making money for yourself on AdWords. And if nobody … If you don’t see any ads, then that’s an even better sign because the clicks are going to be super, super cheap because there’s no competition. So I would just encourage you to kind of look at the landscape of that if you’re not running ads at all, just to see if there’s an opportunity there.

Sheldon:

Cool. All right, so thanks a lot and so I think on our next podcast we can answer some of these other questions. How to know what your competitors are doing on AdWords. Maybe we can dive a little deeper on it, if you want Eric, and then I’m also interested in you have a lot of experience in LinkedIn, and that’s another channel that I know so many people are interested in and it’s a little bit of a newer network I think. It’s not like the big Google and Facebook. So if you’re willing to, I mean it would be awesome to have you on again to talk a bit about LinkedIn and a little deeper in competitor research with AdWords.

Eric:

Absolutely. I’m in.

Sheldon:

Cool. All right, guys, so that’s just wrapping up our podcast today. If you have any questions be sure to leave them in the comments section if you found us through the website, otherwise you have my e-mail, sheldon@supremeoptimization. You can always e-mail us with some questions. We are always open to answering other questions that people ask us, specifically about AdWords, about digital marketing or anything in between as well. So okay, thanks everyone.

Eric:

Thanks, Sheldon. Thanks Leigh.

Sheldon:

Yep, thanks.

Leigh:

All right, see you guys.

Sheldon Zhai

Sheldon Zhai

Sheldon Zhai is the founder and CEO of Supreme Optimization. He's an expert digital marketing and technical web development specialist. Previously he was a molecular biologist and researcher at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. You can find Sheldon Zhai on LinkedIn.

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